One-of-a-Kind Paroches Honors Two Chabad Rebbes

Just in time for the slew of visitors expected for Beis Iyar, the recently restored shul near the Ohel in Lubavitch got a new addition: A unique paroches that pays tribute to the Tzemach Tzedek and Rebbe Maharash.

By Anash.org reporter

Just in time for the slew of visitors expected for Beis Iyar, the recently restored shul near the Ohel in Lubavitch got a new addition: A unique paroches that pays tribute to the Tzemach Tzedek and Rebbe Maharash.

Beis Iyar marks the birthday of the Rebbe Maharash, who lived in the town of the Lubavitch, and whose resting place is in the town’s cemetery, in the Ohel which also houses the resting place of his father, the Tzemach Tzedek.

In honor of the auspicious day, the town is preparing for a large number of visitors, who will come to daven by the Ohel and visit the chotzer of the Rebbeim and the town’s other holy places. Shliach to Lubavitch Rabbi Gavriel Gorodon says that a number of groups are expected to visit, and there will be events and farbrengens planned throughout the day.

Ahead of the visitors, a one-of-a-kind paroches was dedicated in the historic shul bordering the Ohel, which was recently restored and rebuilt.

The paroches, created by David Roitman of Luxury Judaica, is inspired by the shaar blat – the unique border that is printed on the title pages of seforim of the Rabbeim. Every Chabad Rebbe has their own border, personally selected by the Rebbe himself.

On the new paroches, the shaar blat of the Tzemach Tzedek and the Rebbe Maharash are both reproduced, paying tribute to the works of the two Rabbeim whose resting place is just feet away from the Aron Kodesh where the paroches hangs.

In addition, the shul acquired new furniture, including tables and chairs, for the use of the visitors who daven and write a pan in the Shul.

Panim and names to daven for can be sent to mylubavitch@gmail.com.

Discussion
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  1. Were any rabbonim or mashpi’im consulted regarding the use of a Magen Dovid? It’s my impression that since the advent of political Zionism, Chabad refrains from displaying that symbol.

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