She Had No Legs But That Didn’t Stop Her From Dancing

Why would a woman choose to be penniless? In the upcoming Kislev issue of the N’shei Chabad Newsletter, read the true story of a woman who encouraged her husband to sign over all the family’s worldly possessions to a total stranger, in exchange for something intangible that her husband really wanted. (Would you do the same?)

Why would a woman choose to be penniless? In the upcoming Kislev issue of the N’shei Chabad Newsletter, read the true story of a woman who encouraged her husband to sign over all the family’s worldly possessions to a total stranger, in exchange for something intangible that her husband really wanted. (Would you do the same?)

Chana Voola is married to a ger tzedek from India. She writes:

“One of the most frequently recurring questions/comments I hear has to do with the color of our family’s skin. Not mine. I’m white. No one cares much to ask about where I got my tinted pale tone from. People want to know about my children’s skin color, and where it came from. …I cannot count the number of times I am asked, “Is your husband Sefardi?” or “I am trying to figure out what nationality your husband is,” or sometimes I am told, “Your children are beautiful. I love their skin color.”

In the Kislev issue, Chana Voola shares her story including how she ended up homeschooling the Voola children and became a creator of children’s workbooks. The Voolas are on the cover of the new issue.

In the new issue, you will also meet the unforgettable Minna Lederberger of Melbourne, Australia, a double amputee with an inspiring attitude, despite major challenges:

“…As a result of toxic shock, the blood circulation to my hands, lower legs and feet was very poor. The medical team was unable to detect a pulse in my legs.

The doctor said he personally did not believe my feet were “viable,” meaning that they would most probably have to be amputated. The conversation went something like this.

“I’m sorry to tell you, but your feet will need to be amputated.”

I said, “You can’t. I need to be able to dance at my daughter’s wedding.” 

He asked me, “Is she engaged?”

I said, “No, but she will be one day.”

He said, “Don’t worry. You will dance at her wedding.”

The doctor said we had to wait for my lower limbs to “demarcate,” meaning that eventually an obvious line appears between what is healthy tissue and viable, and what is not. The decision of where to amputate would be made based on that. 

My stay in the ICU deconditioned me to such an extent that I couldn’t even press the call button when I needed a nurse. The staff brought me a small bell to shake, but I couldn’t even use it. Dalia and Sam would feed me and brush my teeth. A physiotherapist came daily to help me lift my arms to regain some muscle strength. One day she brought me a picture to color in and I had great difficulty just holding the pencil. She asked me to sign my name, but I couldn’t…

You’ll read these and more stories in the Kislev 2021 issue of the N’shei Chabad Newsletter. Click here to subscribe, or buy it in a Crown Heights store the week before Chanukah.

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