Construction Begins at Cheder Lubavitch Morristown

After years of planning and fundraising, the eagerly anticipated summer construction project has started at Cheder Lubavitch Morristown, aiming to make larger middle and elementary classrooms and significantly expand the preschool.

After years of planning and fundraising, the eagerly anticipated summer construction project has commenced at Cheder Lubavitch Morristown. The project aims to make larger middle and elementary classrooms and significantly expand the preschool.

Renovating within the existing footprint during the short summer months presents logistical challenges, but the community remains optimistic that the work will be completed before the upcoming academic year. This will allow students to return to a fresh and revitalized learning environment. Rabbi Yossi Spalter, a member of the Cheder Vaad, shares, “This renovation represents our investment in the future of chinuch in Morristown for our local community and for shluchim around the state who turn to us for a pristine and warm chassidishe chinuch.”

Just a week into the project, significant progress has been made, with walls, ceilings, and floors already demolished, and new classrooms framed. The aggressive timeline leaves no room for delays.

This project aims to expand and beautify the space that has served as the premier Lubavitch cheder in New Jersey since 1976. The significance of this renovation is heightened by the historical blessing given by the Frierdicker Rebbe who in 1950, upon visiting Morristown, remarked that the air was good for learning Torah. This endorsement laid the foundation for establishing the Rabbinical College of America and other educational institutions in Morristown.

Following the recent completion of the Rabbinical College of America’s state-of-the-art Yeshiva building, this swift commencement of the new project underscores Morristown’s trajectory of growth.

For further updates and to contribute to the ongoing efforts, please visit www.chedermorristown.org

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